Aikido Marketing

Aikido Marketing

At an American Marketing Association presentation I recently attended, my ears perked up when the presenter, Tom Martin of Converse Digital, recommended using a technique he called “aikido selling.” Now, I’ve been training in aikido, a Japanese martial art, since 1997. My rank is currently shodan (1st degree black belt), and I’m an occasional instructor at Aikido of New Orleans, the dojo where I practice. Needless to say, I’m quite familiar with aikido.

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Before You Write, Make a Plan

Before You Write, Make a Plan

You wouldn’t build a house without a blueprint, would you? OK, I probably don’t have many architects among my readers, but if you did build houses, you’d want a blueprint, right?

Or to change up metaphors, you wouldn’t drive from New York to California with only a general sense of which direction west was? No, you’d want a map. Otherwise, you’d be confused about which roads to take, and you’d most certainly get lost along the way. Backtracking and indecision paralysis would make the trip take much longer, and you can add in a dose of frustration for more unpleasantness.

Any task with many options would benefit from some sort of road map, so to speak. That’s why it’s essential to create an outline or some sort of organization scheme before writing just about anything.

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Liberate Your Ideas with Freewriting

Liberate Your Ideas with Freewriting

Although content is an essential aspect of just about any modern marketing endeavor, truly valuable content doesn’t just add more dreck to the digital pile. Good content is about quality ideas—ideas that are helpful, humorous, interesting, or illuminating. Whether you’re writing something as short as a Facebook post or as involved as a white paper, the good ideas underlying what you write are what make it worthwhile.

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Vacant Values

Vacant Values

Major corporations like Wells Fargo wish to portray themselves as good corporate citizens, but the banking giant's recent scandal revealed how it had a habit of scamming customers. Then its leaders tried to shift the blame to low-level employees. In light of these ethical breaches, I was interested in seeing how Wells Fargo publicly depicted its values to the world.

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